Home Documentary

Have you ever thought about how long the world will still retain? For me the world seemed always steady as stone in the sea somehow unshakeable, but when I watched this incredible documentary HOME in 2009, which enlightened me about the vulnerability and real condition of our planet, I started to realize that we have to act soon.

HOME is a free nature documentary directed by the internationally recognized French photographer, journalist and environmentalist Yann Arthus-Bertrand. He is known as one of the most famous aerial photographer on our planet.

The nature documentary HOME is an ode to our precious planet and was shot entirely from the air with a high resolution digital camera. Yann Arthus-Bertrand went with his team in more than 50 countries all over the world.  They flew from tropical rainforest to the arctic seas to major cities such as Dubai, Tokyo and Lagos to capture wonderful pictures and scenes which has no one seen before like this.

With his incredible documentary Yann Arthus-Bertrand shows us on one side the beauty and fascination of our planet and on the other side he tries to warn us with dramatic pictures which show ecological and social problems such as overpopulation, soil erosion, depletion of natural resources and water scarcity. The nature documentary HOME makes critically clear that only man kind is responsible for the loss of our planet. This all seems really frustrating but at the end of the film a glimmer of hope is given to the audience by showing first projects to protect the nature and biodiversity.

In my opinion is HOME a great film which shows us with incredible and grandiose images the unique flora and fauna of our world as well as the threat to the ecological balance caused by humans. Once you have seen this film you will understand how urgent it is to protect and share responsibility for our planet.

“In less than 200 years we have disturbed the balance of the Earth that has been created in over four billion years.”
Yann Arthus-Bertrand

Planet Earth II Makes It More Cinematic

When the BBC launched its Natural History Unit in 1957 to produce radio and TV programs about wildlife, its wind-up film cameras could only run for 20 seconds at a time. There was no way to schedule multi-destination airplane trips, and once a crew arrived at their remote location, they couldn’t communicate with Bristol for weeks or review their footage.

Now, as the BBC releases its latest blue-chip series, Planet Earth II, cameras are smaller than ever, they can shoot at higher frame rates in lower light, and data storage is essentially unlimited.

But each time a technological development threatens to make their jobs easier, the NHU becomes more ambitious. It’s not enough to show a barn owl hunting a harvest mouse — now they want it from the mouse’s point of view. It’s not enough to get footage of snow leopards, one of the hardest animals on the planet to track down — now they want to spy on them from a foot’s distance with motion-detecting cameras.

The result is that Planet Earth II is the most cinematic wildlife film yet.